Get the Weather From the Command Line

On Mac OS X or Linux (in fact anywhere you get the finger command) you can quickly get the weather.
Jared, in our office here, just showed this to me, neato! :)


finger brisbane@graph.no

I particularly like the one line weather report


finger o:brisbane@graph.no

graph.no

To get more info on how to use this, run this from your command line:


finger @graph.no

Find an IP address in files

Ever been looking for a config file that contains an incorrect IP address?

If the IP address you’re looking for is 8.8.8.8

Then this command is for you:

find . -type f -exec grep -l 8.8.8.8 {} \;

It’ll find all occurrences of 8.8.8.8 that appear in files in the current directory and folders below it. With that short list you should be able to find where you need to edit.

Tracking down long running queries in SQL

I’ve had a client whose Linux Server (CentOS) gradually gets slower and slower, then falls over.

By logging into the MySQL command line, we were able to see that there were some long running queries that never end.

show processlist;

returns


| Id | User | Host | db | Command | Time | State | Info |
+———+———-+——————-+————–+———+——+————–+——————————————————————————————————+
| 2322386 | ssgadmin | 10.21.1.149:58526 | sugarcrm_ssg | Query | 2202 | Sending data | SELECT IFNULL(hr_humanresources.last_name,’’) hr_humanresources_last_name ,l3_cstm.verification_c l3 |

The key part here is that hr_humanresources_last_name has an underscore between the table name when it should be a period i.e. hr_humanresources.last_name. Knowing the table name was enough to tell me it was caused by something to do with SugarCRM that’s running on that server. But we don’t yet know what action caused these queries.

Knowing it was 2202 seconds ago from the time we ran the query we are able to pinpoint a time the action occurred. Looking through the SugarCRM log files did turn up that the error was often caused by a single user, but didn’t show up anything to help us figure out exactly what was the causal issue. Talking with that user, getting them to do what they’d done at that time didn’t turn up anything, the error wasn’t reproducing on demand.

So I turned to looking in the tracker table in the SugarCRM MySQL database for entries around the time of the error. Turns out that there is a Dashlet being loaded, that Dashlet uses a Report.

Each time I load the Dashlet or run the Report I get a corresponding long running query turn up. We’ve found our culprit, and we’re now able to recreate the report.

How long running are those queries?

At the MySQL commandline, you can enter
show processlist;
and see what processes are running.
If you’re tracking down some problematic code and you’ve got a query (or set of queries) that don’t end, consume CPU cycles and generally bog everything down to a crawl, it can be helpful to know what time you’ve run the command above. Thusly, I now run this:

show processlist; select now as current_date_time;

and it rather nicely tells me the current date/time on the MySQL server, using the Time column from the processlist, you can work out a tad more accurately when a query started, giving you a starting point to look in other logs.
Now those long running sql queries are easier to track down.

Encrypt and decrypt .zip files on Mac OS X

I just needed to compress and encrypt some files on Mac OS X. The following command does that:
zip -ejr TARGET SOURCEFOLDER
This will ask for a password (twice to confirm it), encrypt and compress the sourcefolder and put it into a file named target (and auto add the .zip extension).

To unzip it do this:
unzip SOURCE -d TARGETFOLDER
This will ask for the password, decrypt and uncompress it into the targetfolder.

How to backup SugarCRM from the command line

From the linux command line, these commands let you backup and restore a SugarCRM database.

Update 2016-04-26: Just saw this SugarCRM KB Providing a Backup Without Sensitive Data which is really useful. Thanks Jared.

Firstly, for a proper back up of SugarCRM you’ll need two files, one containing the application files, one containing the SQL database.

First up, the backup…

Backup files:

Change to the folder you want to backup, then…

tar -zcvf CRM-BACKUP-FILES.tar.gz .

Edit: if you get an error ‘Permission Denied’ you may be trying to write to a folder you don’t have permission for, instead try writing to ~/CRM-BACKUP-FILES.tar.gz and it will likely work.
Edit: see also this StackOverflow article.

Backup sql (empty copy of the database):

mysqldump -u USERNAME -p -–no-data DATABASENAME > CRM-BACKUP-SQL.sql

Backup sql (with the data) :

mysqldump -u USERNAME -p DATABASENAME > CRM-BACKUP-SQL.sql

Then you can ‘tar’ the .sql file with

tar -zcvf DATABASENAME-mysql.tar.gz DATABASENAME-mysql.sql

Backup just a single table

mysqldump db_name table_name | gzip > table_name.sql.gz

If you only want the database schema, then in the SugarCRM web application you can do the following:

  • Admin
  • Diagnostic Tool
  • db schema
  • Download that file

Then for the restoration…

Restore files (to current folder):

tar -zxvf CRM-BACKUP-FILES.tar.gz

Restore sql:

mysql -u USERNAME -p DATABASENAME < CRM-BACKUP-SQL.sql

Restore just a single table

gunzip < table_name.sql.gz | mysql -u username -p db_name

These SugarCRM Knowledge Base articles may also be of use: